Still my favorite earring// mokite cubes

Still my favorite earring// mokite cubes

5 notes, April 19, 2014

RESURRECT DEEZ NUTS

RESURRECT DEEZ NUTS

9 notes, April 19, 2014

GABO! I wasn’t ready for his passing. Que espiritú tan hermoso y sabio. Rest in flowers, querido.

GABO! I wasn’t ready for his passing. Que espiritú tan hermoso y sabio. Rest in flowers, querido.

2 notes, April 17, 2014

duh

duh

(Source: rihannalb)

Reblogged from bikinikillher, 18,712 notes, April 17, 2014

tvislikecracktome:

The Face Australia talks honestly about an issue I face everyday. I think we should all take a moment to really appreciate how difficult day to day life can be when faced with something so hopelessly inescapable… Please take a moment of your time to watch.

Our struggle is real

Reblogged from oneforthehead, 13 notes, April 17, 2014

My two Gods acknowledging each other

(Source: fuckyeahdragrace.com)

Reblogged from divalopment, 24,707 notes, April 17, 2014

neoafrican:

So excited for my big sister @prissyville ♥♥♥ her blog will be live on May 5th! Follow her on IG and Facebook! Love you Prissy :-)

neoafrican:

So excited for my big sister @prissyville ♥♥♥ her blog will be live on May 5th! Follow her on IG and Facebook! Love you Prissy :-)

Reblogged from neoafrican, 66 notes, April 17, 2014

sheer-powder:

“We’ve been ‘cool’ for a very long time, and in that sense our culture has been taken for a very long time. How do we define when we’ve arrived? It’s not when a young, white girl in Berkley is wearing nice garlands or those nice buddhist beads, or wearing bindi. I don’t feel like my life in anyway has been improved because she has the ability to do that and thinks that’s okay. My life hasn’t improved. The life of my mother has not improved. Our voice as a community within this economic system has not improved. 
A good friend of mine, she’s south Indian, and she grew up in Connecticut. Her mom would make her wear her bindi and go to school. She would get harassed by kids… she would be harassed so much that what she would do, is that because she was so ashamed to have that bindi on her head, she would leave her house, wipe it off… and then come home and put it back on.
To the point where a child would have to think about such a deliberate attempt to refute their own culture I think is pretty profound. If there’s a white girl wearing a bindi walking down central avenue in the heights, she’s not considered a dot head, even though she has a dot on her head.
For me, the feeling is disgust and anger. The way I look at it if I see it, I just get so mad because I think, how dare this person be able to wear that, or hold that, or put that statue in her house and not take any of the oppression for that. How dare they. That’s not fair. We have to take so much heat and repression for expressing ourselves.
I’m going to rip that thing off your head, and I’m going to scrub that mehndi off your hands, because you don’t have the right to wear it. Until the day when you walk in our shoes, and you face what we face… the pain, and the shame, and the hurt, and the fear, you don’t have the right to wear that. It is not your right, and you’re not worthy of it. I feel like it’s so superficial and it’s so disrespected. One day, wake up, be me, and then you’ll see how powerful what you’re wearing is. ”
—Raahi Reddy, Yellow Apparel: When the Coolie Becomes Cool 

sheer-powder:

We’ve been ‘cool’ for a very long time, and in that sense our culture has been taken for a very long time. How do we define when we’ve arrived? It’s not when a young, white girl in Berkley is wearing nice garlands or those nice buddhist beads, or wearing bindi. I don’t feel like my life in anyway has been improved because she has the ability to do that and thinks that’s okay. My life hasn’t improved. The life of my mother has not improved. Our voice as a community within this economic system has not improved. 

A good friend of mine, she’s south Indian, and she grew up in Connecticut. Her mom would make her wear her bindi and go to school. She would get harassed by kids… she would be harassed so much that what she would do, is that because she was so ashamed to have that bindi on her head, she would leave her house, wipe it off… and then come home and put it back on.

To the point where a child would have to think about such a deliberate attempt to refute their own culture I think is pretty profound. If there’s a white girl wearing a bindi walking down central avenue in the heights, she’s not considered a dot head, even though she has a dot on her head.

For me, the feeling is disgust and anger. The way I look at it if I see it, I just get so mad because I think, how dare this person be able to wear that, or hold that, or put that statue in her house and not take any of the oppression for that. How dare they. That’s not fair. We have to take so much heat and repression for expressing ourselves.

I’m going to rip that thing off your head, and I’m going to scrub that mehndi off your hands, because you don’t have the right to wear it. Until the day when you walk in our shoes, and you face what we face… the pain, and the shame, and the hurt, and the fear, you don’t have the right to wear that. It is not your right, and you’re not worthy of it. I feel like it’s so superficial and it’s so disrespected. One day, wake up, be me, and then you’ll see how powerful what you’re wearing is. ”

—Raahi Reddy, Yellow Apparel: When the Coolie Becomes Cool 

Reblogged from divalopment, 4,591 notes, April 17, 2014

fieryfruit:

to avoid grinding, always leave some room for Jesus

fieryfruit:

to avoid grinding, always leave some room for Jesus

Reblogged from tothedirigible, 26,303 notes, April 17, 2014

f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

 faig ahmeds Embroidered Art 

When you think of traditional carpets from Azerbaijan, the thought of contemporary art does not quickly spring to mind… but these beautiful, and modern works will change that. Faiq Ahmed, a native of the Eurasian nation, has taken his countries old-school art form and brought it beautifully into the current era, deconstructing the ancient process of weaving and adapting it to todays contemporary art forms.

Reblogged from tothedirigible, 28,717 notes, April 16, 2014

(Source: kittiezandtittiez)

Reblogged from banjee-boi, 1,061 notes, April 14, 2014

This is my prayer

0 notes, April 9, 2014

Speaking on Arthur Jafa’s Dreams Are Colder than Death (film)/Afro-futurism/Afro-pessimism

"Jafa mentioned in the discussion after the film that in one particular West African indigenous group, if certain children were past the point of initiation, they were not able to be reclaimed and thus were left in the woods to die. He asked how did that relate to the diaspora; are we the monsters in the woods, the dark big bad wolf in a sense. Jafa emphasized that this was something we need to address to heal…"

ALSO, I’m trying to locate this film (DREAMS ARE COLDER THAN DEATH). Anyone got any leads?

0 notes, April 8, 2014

Summertime interspecies love affair

I left my window open and some new buds crawled in and are hangin w me in my bed right now. One looks like a ladybug except way tinier and checkered. Then there’s what i think might be a little outside flea (harmless). And a little green dude that looks like a micro grasshopper, he’s chillin on my knee. I like all of them. I’m very happy with all my new friendships.

4 notes, April 7, 2014

gavinrillon:

Mmmhm! *snap *snap

(Source: versaceslut)

Reblogged from blackfashion, 23,995 notes, April 7, 2014